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J. Robert Van Pelt and John and Ruanne Opie Library

CH2411 & CH2421 Organic Chemistry: CH2411 Session 2 - Scifinder

Andrew Galerneau

Ch2411 Session 2

In the second CH2411 library session, students will use SciFinder locate a journal article describing the first synthesis of an assigned compound using two different search methods.

Librarians are available to answer your questions. Click on the Ask Us bubble for FAQs and contact options (chat, email, text, phone).

Top 5 Library FAQ's:

SciFinder Access and Registration

NOTE, November 2020:

Scifinder will be moving to a new, updated platform called Scifinder-n (Dec 2020, exact date TBD). It was brought to our attention that when you register for a new Scifinder account, the link in your confirmation email will direct you to Scifinder-n. Until December 1, this link will not work. Instead, after registering, access Scifinder using the instructions below instead of the email link. After December 1, the link in the email will work, but the platform you access through it will not match the video tutorial you need to view for your CH2411 assignment. Use the links below to access the old platform - it will remain available. The library is working with Scifinder to fix these inconsistencies - in the meantime, please contact us at library@mtu.edu if you have any issues!

To access and/or register for Scifinder:

  • Select Databases on the library’s website and enter Scifinder into the “Search for Databases” box. 
  • Login with the username and password you created for SciFinder OR Go to the SciFinder registration site if you have not previously created a username and password for this resource.
  • After entering SciFinder, you can access additional tutorials, seminars and guides on using the database by clicking Help, then SciFinder training.

 

What's in SciFinder?

Scifinder is the primary resource for chemistry and related sciences with information that students will use throughout their studies. Information is retrieved from the Chemical Abstracts Service and MEDLINE. Generally, publications and other sources begin with 1907 – present. The five Chemical Abstracts Service databases included in SciFinder are:

  • CAplus: patent and journal references covering important areas such as proteomics, genomics, biochemistry, organic, inorganic, physical, analytical and macromolecular. It also includes patents from the world’s major patient authorities and other literature including theses, conferences, book chapters and more.

  • CAS Registry: substances from articles, patients, chemical catalogs and reputable Web sources from the 1800s to present including GenBank sequences, organic substances, inorganic, polymers, proteins and more with 12,000 new substances added daily.

  • CASREACT: Single- and multi-step reactions consisting of structure diagrams and CAS Registry Numbers for all reactants, products, reagents, solvents and catalysts. Nearly 50,000 reactions added weekly.

  • CHEMLIST: Chemical substances that are regulated in key markets world-wide, including chemical names, synonyms, regulatory lists including 13 national inventories and state lists.

  • CHEMCATS: Commercially available chemicals and their suppliers including CAS Registry Number, supplier contact, inventory quantities, prices and compliance information.

SciFinder Tutorial

Two Methods to Search SciFinder

Method #1

  • Click on Explore Substances at the top of the screen.
  • Click on Substance Identifier on the left side of the screen.
  • Enter your compound name or CAS # and click Search.
  • Verify that you’ve found the correct substance; click on Substance Detail for more information about the compound.
  • Click Get Reactions at the top of the page or Reactions in the  body of the page
  • Select Product as the reaction role
  • To look for th first synthesis - scroll down to the earliest reaction listed (Note: avoid using theses, dissertations and review articles.)
  • To view the full entry of a reference, including an abstract, click on the article title.
  • To determine whether the library owns the journal, either click the Get Full Text button to retrieve the full text of the article, if the library owns it electronically, or conduct a Basic search by Journal Title in the Library Catalog.  If the library owns print volumes, the holdings and locations will be listed in the Catalog.  You can then click on HuskyFetch to determine whether the library also has electronic holdings.

Method #2

  • Click on Explore Substances at the top of the screen.
  • Click on Substance Identifier on the left side of the screen.
  • Enter your compound name or CAS # and click Search.
  • Verify that you’ve found the correct substance; click on Substance Detail for more information about the compound.
  • Click on the link indicating the number of References to view the list of articles on the substance.
  • In the window that appears, select Preparation from the "Limit results to" choices, then click the Get button.
  • Since you’re looking for the first successful synthesis, scroll down to the bottom of the references list to view the oldest references. (Note: avoid using theses, dissertations and review articles.)
  • This step may take some additional analysis, if you are not sure if the article you are looking at is describing the first successful synthesis of your compound, consult with your TA.
  • To view the full entry of a reference, including an abstract, click on the article title.
  • To determine whether the library owns the journal, either click the Get Full Text button to retrieve the full text of the article, if the library owns it electronically, or conduct a Basic search by Journal Title in the Library Catalog.  If the library owns print volumes, the holdings and locations will be listed in the Catalog.  You can then click on HuskyFetch to determine whether the library also has electronic holdings.